History

Undoubtedly a great subject, the study of history has become more interesting and challenging with newer and newer declassified records and information. Hence, the ability to do archival work has become core to the study of history. One of the greatest advantages of the subject of history is that it teaches you to marshal vast amounts of information and make sense of them in relation to a well-defined theme. Not surprisingly, most universities offer training in skills, concepts and theories required for dissertation research.

The MSt in British and European History, from 1500 to the Present at Oxford “is open to all students whose research focuses on post-medieval Britain and Europe (which may also include non-European elements, for example European expansion, Empire building or emigration)”

(http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/mst-british-and-european-history-from-1500).

The University College of London offers an MA in History “primarily aimed at students interested in the early modern and modern periods, but options from the medieval and ancient periods are also available”

(http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/postgraduatestudy/taughtmasters/ma_history).

Lancaster University offers an MA in History featured by The Independent in 2015 which “highlighted the option our students have to work with heritage organisations on a placement scheme as an example of the valuable transferable skills postgraduate study gives students” (http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/masters/). King’s College London offers an MA in European History

(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/european-history-ma.aspx).

College of Arts & Sciences, American University, Washington DC offers an MA in History. It says: “The history master’s degree program stresses broad understandings of the past, the development of the capacity for specialized research, and the cultivation of collegial relationships. History MA students may concentrate on American history, modern European history, or public history and develop minor fields of study (outside fields), as well as (major or minor) cross national and cross disciplinary fields”

(http://www.american.edu/cas/history/MA-HIST.cfm).

Indiana University, Bloomington offers several Masters in history – Ancient History and Language Acquisition, Russian or East European History, United States History, Dual master’s degree in history and library science and Dual master’s degree in history and Jewish studies

(http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/grad/masters.shtml).  

Columbia University in the city of New York offers a dual MA/MSc degree in International and World History in partnership with the London School of Economics (http://history.columbia.edu/graduate/masters/index.html).

McGill University offers two programmes of MA in history, one with a thesis and the other without. It also offers an MA History of Medicine (Non-thesis). It recommends MA by course work and research for those who wish to go on to a PhD programme (https://www.mcgill.ca/history/graduate/ma).

Students who wish to study in Europe may consider the History Department at Central European University as it is accredited both in the Continent (Hungary) and the United States (http://history.ceu.edu/).